Wilson Evolution Basketball for 18 year old athletes

About Wilson Evolution Basketballs for 18+ year olds

At the heart of sports history for almost a century, no other company has been as influential and intimately involved in shaping the games of tennis, golf, baseball and American football as Wilson. As the originator of breakthrough technologies, Wilson has produced legendary classics and earned world-wide legitimacy in each sport it participates in. Backed by generations of athletes, Wilson is the true American icon in the world of sports equipment. As is the Wilson Evolution Basketball.

Wilson is the world’s leading manufacturer of ball sports equipment. Our core sports are tennis, baseball, American football, golf, basketball, softball, badminton and squash. The Wilson business is structured into three business areas: Racquet Sports, Team Sports and Golf.

Headquartered in Chicago, in the United States, Wilson employs over 1,600 people globally. Our dedicated sales network serves customers in over 100 countries.

THE STANDARD FOR INNOVATION.

NCAA® GAME BALL

The Wilson® NCAA® Game Ball features the only moisture  absorbing cover on the market, laid-in-channels create a 100%  composite basketball and a revolutionary cushion core carcass.

Wilson Evolution Basketball TECHNOLOGY BENEFIT

  • 100% Moisture Absorbing Pebbled composite leather for enhanced
  • Composite Cover gripability and consistent feel
  • Composite Patented Aqua-Grip™ laid-in-channels
  • Laid-In-Channels enhance gripability
  • Cushion Core Carcass Low-density sponge rubber and ultra durable butyl rubber give exceptional feel

Wilson Evolution Indoor Regulation Basketball AUTHENTICITY BENEFIT

NCAA®
Approved by NCAA®
NFHS®
Approved by NFHS
The NCAA Game Ball sets the standards for performance and innovation on the court.  Patented features include the only moisture absorbing cover on the market and laid in channels creating a 100% composite cover.  No other basketball provides more gripability and playability helping players raise the level of their game.   The Official Ball of the NCAA Championships and NCAA March Madness is simply the best basketball on the market and behind more NCAA winning moments than any other ball.

NCAA® OFFICIAL PINK GAME BALL for 18+ year old women

STOCK NO.  WTB0701PK

Size: Intermediate/28.5

Because Wilson is committed to furthering our support of breast cancer research, we designed the NCAA® Official Game Ball in pink. Wilson will make a donation of $10 to The Breast Cancer Research Foundation for every NCAA® Official Pink Game Ball that is sold. This ball sets the standard for performance and innovation on the court and it furthers our decade long partnership with the BCRF® to support breast cancer research.

Wilson Wave Evolution Game Ball

Wave Triple Threat Technology sets a new standard for performance in a basketball. Born from countless play-test with top players across the world the demand for more control on the court is answered. The additional 24 T3 Grooves in to the normal flat panels of a basketball allow a player to better control all aspects of their game.  Approved by the NFHS the Wave improves your shooting, ball handling and overall grip. Combined with our exclusive   Moisture Absorbing Cover this is the most innovative basketball technology on the market today.

Evolution Game Ball

There is a reason that the Evolution is the #1 Selling High School basketball in the country.  Wilson combines Laid in Channels patented technology and our exclusive Cushion Core Technology along with its exclusive premium Microfiber Composite Cover delivering maximum grip and player control.

Microfiber Composite Leather Cover:  Wilson Game Balls are made with the highest quality composite leather covers

Composite Laid-In Channels:  Patented Aqua-Grip laid-in channels replace traditional rubber with pebbled composite leather to enhance gripability

Cushion Core Technology:  Exclusive Cushion Core Technology combines low-density sponge rubber and ultra-durable butyl rubber producing a basketball with exceptional feel

PRODUCT SPECS

Size Official – 29.5″
Cover Material Exclusive microfiber composite leather cover
Channels Pebbled composite channels

Reviews

I play in a senior men’s league, age 50 and older. We have up to 24 guys playing three days a week. Many of the guys bring their own basketballs. I’m the only one with the Evolution, and overwhelmingly, my ball is the one preferred and the one chosen when the game starts. I’ve owned the ball for eight months, and it looks like new. The feel, the grip, the non-slip is exceptional. If you want a great indoor ball at a reasonable price, then Evolution is the one.

Best Basketball. Great feel and grip. We bought a $100 Spadling NBA basketball and we are not satisfied. We are going to buy another Wilson Evolution and that will be all we buy in the future.

About Basketball

basketball is a spherical inflated ball used in the game of basketball. Basketballs typically range in size from very small promotional items only a few inches in diameter to extra large balls nearly a foot in diameter used in training exercises to increase the skill of players. The standard size of a basketball in the NBA is 29.5 to 29.875 inches (75 to 75.88 cm) in circumference.[1]

Nearly all basketballs have an inflatable inner rubber bladder, generally wrapped in layers of fiber and then covered with a tacky surface made either from leather (traditional), rubber, or a synthetic composite. As in most inflatable balls, there is a small opening that allows the pressure to be increased or decreased.

The surface of the ball is nearly always divided by “ribs” that are recessed below the surface of the ball in a variety of configurations and are generally a contrasting color. An orange surface with black ribs and a possible logo is the traditional color scheme of basketballs but they are sold in various colors.

Balls are generally designated for indoor (generally made of leather or absorbent composites), or all-surface use (generally made of rubber or durable composites, also known as Indoor/Outdoor balls). Indoor balls tend to be considerably more expensive than all-surface balls due to cost of materials. In addition, brand new all-leather indoor balls must be “broken in” first to achieve optimal grip before use in competition. The abrasiveness of asphalt and the dirt and moisture present in an outdoor setting will usually ruin an indoor ball within a very short period of time, which is why an indoor/outdoor ball is recommended for recreational players.

Aside from the court and the baskets, the basketball is the only piece of equipment necessary to play the game of basketball. During the game, the ball must be bounced continuously (dribbling), thrown through the air to other players (passing) and towards the basket (shooting). Therefore, the ball must be very durable and easy to hold on to. The basketball is also used to perform tricks (sometimes called freestyling), the most common of which are spinning the ball on the tip of one’s index finger, dribbling in complex patterns, rolling the ball over one’s shoulder, or performing aerobatic maneuvers with the ball while executing a slam dunk, most notably in the context of a slam dunk contest.

Wilson’s top-of-the-line product is the Evolution ball, named for its ability to absorb moisture over the course of a game and retain its grip. The ball is the official ball of all NCAA postseason tournaments, most notably the men’s and women’s Division I tournaments, and is used by many NCAA teams during the season as well by many high school leagues. Like Spalding, Wilson produces a variety of balls for the consumer market as well. Since 2012 Wilson’s Evolution ball is the official ball of the 2nd Bundesliga in Germany.

When the NBA tried to change up the game ball

he NBA is introducing a new Official Game Ball for play beginning in the 2006-07 season. The new ball, manufactured by Spalding, features a new design and a new material that together offer better grip, feel, and consistency than the current leather ball. This marks the first change to the ball in over 35 years and only the second in 60 seasons. In 1970, the ball was transitioned from a four panel to an eight panel ball. NBA Commissioner David Stern, Spalding Group Vice President Dan Touhey, NBA Sr. Vice President of Basketball Operations Stu Jackson, Boston Celtics’ Forward Paul Pierce, and NBA on TNT analyst and two-time NBA champion Kenny Smith unveiled the new Game Ball today at the NBA Store on Fifth Avenue prior to the 2006 NBA Draft.

The new ball features Spalding’s Cross Traxxion™ technology, a union of revolutionary design and breakthrough material. The design is comprised of two interlocking, cross-shaped panels rather than the eight oblong panels found on traditional basketballs. As a result, there is more material coverage. The material is a microfiber composite with moisture management that provides superior grip and feel throughout the course of a game. Additionally, the new composite material eliminates the need for a break-in period, which is necessary for the current leather ball, and achieves consistency from ball to ball.

The advancements that Spalding has made to the new game ball ensure that the best basketball players in the world will be playing with the best basketball in the world,” said Stern.

The NBA and Spalding subjected the ball to a rigorous evaluation process that included laboratory and on-court testing. Every NBA team received the new ball and had the opportunity to use it in practice. The ball also was tested in the NBA Development Leagueand was used in activities during NBA All-Star 2006 in Houston. NBA retired players Steve Kerr and Mark Jackson participated in testing the new ball as well.

“Spalding’s continual efforts to advance basketball technology have yielded the optimal ball, one that is worthy of the new Official NBA Game Ball designation,” said Spalding Group President and CEO Scott Creelman. “We are honored that the NBA collaborated with us to make this change.”

The ball will be used in all NBA events leading up to next season including summer leagues, preseason and training camps, and NBA Europe Live presented by EA Sports. All active players will receive a personalized ball, as will each player selected in the 2006 NBA Draft.

Fans will have an opportunity to see the new ball tonight during the 2006 NBA Draft televised live on ESPN at 7 p.m. EST. The ball will hit store shelves at major sporting goods outlets on October 31 coinciding with the tip-off of the 2006-07 season. A limited number of new balls will be available today at the world’s only NBA Store on Fifth Avenue in New York City. Fans can also pre-order their new ball online at NBAStore.com for delivery at the start of the 2006-07 season.

As the Official Game Ball supplier of the NBA since 1983, Spalding will continue to produce the only basketball used during all NBA practices, exhibitions, games and international competitions. Spalding maintains the exclusive rights to produce and sell a complete line of NBA and team-identified basketballs in all sizes including full, junior, youth and mini.

About Spalding

As a Division of Russell Corporation, the Spalding Group consists of three business units: Spalding in Springfield, MA; American Athletic, Inc. (AAI) in Jefferson, IA; and Huffy Sports, in Sussex, WI. The three companies, collectively combined, are now the largest basketball equipment supplier in the world. Spalding is the official basketball supplier of the National Basketball Association (NBA) and Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA), the official backboard of the NBA and NCAA, the official volleyball of the King of the Beach Volleyball Tour, the official soccer ball of the Major Indoor Soccer League (MISL) and the official football of the Arena Football League (AFL) and Pop Warner. For more information, visit www.spalding.com

About the NBA

The NBA, founded in 1946, is a global sports and entertainment property that features 30 teams in the United States and Canada. During the 2005-06 season, the NBA distributed 44,000 hours of programming to 215 countries and territories in 43 languages. The league’s worldwide reach can also be seen with 82 international players on NBA rosters. Domestically, the NBA televised 142 games on national television this regular season on ABC, TNT, ESPN and ESPN2, and eclipsed attendance records for the third consecutive season.

More than 200 licensees manufacture and promote NBA products, which are sold in more than 100,000 retail stores in 100 countries on six continents. Major categories include video games, apparel, sporting goods and trading cards. The NBA also owns and operates the world’s only NBA Store in New York City and NBAStore.com. The NBA Store receives over 1 million visitors annually, and features an array of multimedia attractions, including a fully operational broadcast booth and an official half-court used for special events, and regularly-scheduled appearances by NBA and WNBA players, legends and celebrities. NBAStore.com receives over 20 million visitors each year and offers international stores online in Chinese, Japanese, French and Spanish.

As fans witness tremendous performances on the court, some of the NBA’s most significant efforts occur off the court. This past year, the league launched its most ambitious community outreach endeavor, NBA Cares. Over a five-year span, players and teams will raise and contribute $100 million for charity, donate more than one million hours of volunteer service to communities worldwide, and build more than 100 educational and athletic facilities where children can learn and play. For more information on the NBA, visit NBA.com.

Modern Day Game Ball Regulations

Organized basketball leagues generally have very rigorous specifications for the balls to be used in official competition including weight, inflation pressure, bounce, circumference, color, and materials used. Most leagues use very similar specifications for their balls which are referred to as size 7 (for men’s competition) and size 6 (for women’s competition) by manufacturers. However the specific wording and policy on manufacturers vary between leagues. Here are the official specifications for three popular leagues:

  • The International Basketball Federation (FIBA) has very strict criteria for its certified basketballs: The ball must be size 7, bear the name of the manufacturer and a serial number. It must be made of either genuine or artificial/synthetic leather and must be free of toxic materials and materials which may cause allergic reactions, and must also be free of heavy metals and AZO colors, though FIBA does not specify a specific color for the ball. It must be between 749 millimeters (mm) and 780 mm (29.5–30.7 in) in circumference, it must bounce at least 1300 mm (51.2 in) measured from the top of the ball when dropped from a height of 1800 mm (70.9 in) measured from the bottom of the ball[2] on a hard surface with a mass of more than 1 ton, and it must weigh between 567 grams (g) and 650 g (20–22.9 oz). The ball must also pass a battery of rigorous tests: a fatigue test where it is bounced 20,000 times at a reference pressure without leaking any air, and then perform to specification when dropped from the reference height (1800 mm); a heat test where it is stored in a room for 7 days at 70 Celsius (158 Fahrenheit) and show no difference in appearance or performance; a valve test where a dry inflation needle is inserted into the ball 100 times and the ball must not show any leakage afterwards; and a friction test where the outer surface must match or exceed friction requirements or perform to the testers’ satisfaction in a practice game. The manufacturer of the ball must have been certified by FIBA, which entails submitting balls for testing and paying a $3,000 testing fee, paying $13,000 per year in licensing fees, and printing the FIBA logo on each ball. Any manufacturer may submit for testing and certification.[3]
  • The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has less stringent requirements: The ball must measure between 29.5 and 30 inches (749–762 mm) in circumference, bounce between 49 and 54 inches (1245–1372 mm) when dropped from a height of 6 feet (1829 mm), and must weigh between 20 and 22 ounces (567–624 g) for men’s competition (size 7), and measure between 28.5 and 29 inches (724–737 mm) in circumference, bounce between 51 and 56 inches (1295–1422 mm) when dropped from a height of 6 feet (1829 mm), and must weigh between 18 and 20 ounces (510–567 g) for women’s competition (Size 6). Though the NCAA does not specify a particular manufacturer for the ball in regular season play, the Wilson SOLUTION basketball is the official basketball of the NCAA tournament.
  • The National Basketball Association (NBA) allows only one official ball: The ball must be the official NBA game ball manufactured by Spalding. The ball is orange in color, 29.5 (749 mm) inches in circumference and weighs 22 ounces (624 g) (size 7). It must also be inflated to between 7.5 and 8.5 pounds per square inch. Starting in the 2006 season, the NBA switched to a new ball from Spalding that had a synthetic surface and a modified rib pattern (See section below). Until 2005 the ball had a leather surface. On December 11, 2006 the NBA decided to revert to the old leather ball due to numerous player complaints, lawsuits and injuries, mostly scratched hands, from the synthetic ball.[5] Spalding has manufactured the official NBA game ball since 1983.
  • The Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) has similar requirements to the NBA: The ball must be the official WNBA game ball manufactured by Spalding. The ball must be orange and white in color, between 28.5 and 29 inches (724–737 mm) in circumference and weigh between 18 and 20 ounces (510–567 g) (size 6)

Some of the most notable basketball manufacturers today are Molten, Wilson, Spalding and Nike.

You also want the basketball to go well with the flooring and surface aka the basketball court, whether it be indoor or outdoor.

In basketball, the basketball court is the playing surface, consisting of a rectangular floor with tiles at either end. In professional or organized basketball, especially when played indoors, it is usually made out of a wood, often maple, and highly polished. Outdoor surfaces are generally made from standard paving materials such as concrete or asphalt (i.e. blacktop/tarmac).

Basketball courts come in different shapes and sizes and colors. In the NBA, the court is 94 feet by 50 ft (28.65m by 15.24m). UnderInternational Basketball Federation (FIBA) rules,[1] the court is minutely smaller, measuring exactly 28 m by 15 m (91’10.4″ by 49’2.6″). A high school court is slightly smaller, at 84′ by 50′ and some elementary schools have courts measuring 74′ x 42′. In amateur basketball, court sizes vary widely. The baskets are always 10′ (3.05m) above the floor (except possibly in youth competition). Basketball courts have a three-point arc at both baskets. A basket made from behind this arc is worth three points; a basket made from within this line, or with a player’s foot touching the line is worth two points. The free-throw line, where one stands while taking a foul shot, is located within the three-point arc.[2]

Center circle[edit]

The only two players permitted to enter this area prior to the tipoff are the players contesting the jump ball (usually but not always centers). Both players jump when the referee throws the ball in the air, each attempting to tap the ball into the hands of a player of their own team.

Three-point line[edit]

The three-point line is the line that separates the two-point area from the three-point area; any shot converted beyond this line counts as three points. If the shooting player steps on the line, it is counted as two points only. Any foul made in the act of shooting beyond the three-point line would give the player three free throws if the shot doesn’t go in, and one if it does.

The distance to the three-point line from the center of the basket varies depending on the level or league, and has changed several times. These are the current distances, with the league or level using each distance:

19.75 ft (6.01 m): High School

20.75 ft (6.32 m): NCAA

21.65 ft (6.60 m) to 22.15 ft (6.75 m): WNBA and FIBA

25 ft (7.62 m) to 23.75 ft (7.24 m): NBA

The NBA adopted the three-point line at the start of the 1979–80 season. This is of variable distance, ranging from 22 feet (6.7 m) in the corners to 23.75 feet (7.24 m) behind the top of the key. During the 1994–95, 1995–96 and 1996–97 seasons, the NBA attempted to address decreased scoring by shortening the overall distance of the line to a uniform 22 feet (6.7 m) around the basket. It was moved back to its original distance after the 1996–97 season.

In college basketball as well as in most high school associations in the United States, the distance is 19.75 feet. On May 26, 2007, the NCAA playing rules committee agreed to move the three-point line back one foot to 20.75 feet for the men. This rule went into effect for the 2008–2009 season. The three-point line for women (NCAA) moved back one foot to 20.75 feet at the start of the 2011–2012 season.

The international distance, used in most countries outside the United States and in FIBA and WNBA competition, is currently 6.6 m (21.65 ft) to 6.75 m (22.15 ft).

Perimeter[edit]

The perimeter is defined as the areas outside the free throw lane and inside the three-point line. Shots converted (successfully made) from this area are called “perimeter shots” or “medium-range shots.” If a player’s foot is on the three-point line, the shot is considered a perimeter shot.

Low post area[edit]

The low post is defined as the areas that are closest to the basket but outside of the free throw lane.[4] This area is fundamental to strategy in basketball. Skilled low post players can score many points per game without ever taking a jump shot.

Key[edit]

The key or shaded lane refers to the usually painted area beneath the basket; for the NBA it is 16 feet (4.9 m) wide, for the NCAA it is 12 feet (3.7 m) wide; for both instances it extends 15 feet (4.6 m) from the backboard. At the top of the rectangle is the free-throw line, behind which players shoot uncontested shots when they’re fouled. A circle is drawn around the free-throw line with a 6 feet (1.8 m) radius; this is used for jump ball instances, as is done at the center circle. Two 6-inch hash lines, 3 ft from the free throw lane line and 5 ft 8 in from the free throw line, show the lower defensive box linked to the restricted area.

For FIBA tournaments, since October 2010 the key has been a rectangle 4.9 m wide and 5.8 m long. Previously it was a trapezoid 3.7 meters (12 ft) wide at the free-throw line and 6 meters (19 feet and 6.25 inches) at the end line.

The key is primarily used to prevent players from staying beneath the basket of the opponents’ team for long periods (maximum three seconds).

Restricted area arc

The restricted area arc is a semi-circular arc drawn around the area directly underneath the basket. With some exceptions, defending teammates cannot draw charging fouls in this area. The restricted arc in NBA and WNBA competition has a radius 4 feet (1.22 m) from below the center of the basket. The restricted arc in NCAA competition (both men’s and women’s) is of radius 3 feet (0.91 m) from below the center of the basket.

Other lines

On NBA floors, two hash marks are drawn at the end lines near the key to mark the area known as the lower defensive box. A defensive player is allowed to draw a charging foul within the restricted arc if the offensive player receives the ball and/or starts his drive within this area. [5]

Also, two lines are drawn on each of the sidelines, 28 feet from each of the endlines, which designates the extent of the coaching box and bench. This line marks the farthest extent a coach (aside from the sidelines) can stand. Directly behind this area is the team bench.

On the half-court line of NBA floors two lines extend outside the playing court, designating the place where substitutes wait before they can enter the playing court; directly behind this area are the various off-court officials such as the timekeeper and reserve referee.

FIBA changes

On April 26, 2008, FIBA announced several major rules changes involving the court markings. These changes took effect for major international competitions on October 1, 2010, after that year’s World Championships for men and women, and became mandatory for other competitions on October 1, 2012 (although national federations could adopt the new markings before 2012). The changes were as follows.

  • The shape of the key changed from a trapezoid to a rectangle as it is in the NBA, with NBA dimensions.
  • The three-point line moved back to 6.75 metres (22 ft 1.7 in) from 6.25 metres (20 ft 6.1 in), compared to 23 ft 9 in (7.24 m) for the NBA at the top of the arc.
  • The FIBA adopted the NBA’s restricted area arc with a marginally wider radius of 1.25 metres (4 ft 1.2 in)

Why your Wilson Evolution Basketball Matters

There are 4 areas to the game that you must be mindful of. They’re why you should invest in an Evolution basketball.

Shooting

wilson evolution game ball

Shooting is the act of attempting to score points by throwing the ball through the basket, methods varying with players and situations.

Typically, a player faces the basket with both feet facing the basket. A player will rest the ball on the fingertips of the dominant hand (the shooting arm) slightly above the head, with the other hand supporting the side of the ball. The ball is usually shot by jumping (though not always) and extending the shooting arm. The shooting arm, fully extended with the wrist fully bent, is held stationary for a moment following the release of the ball, known as a follow-through. Players often try to put a steady backspin on the ball to absorb its impact with the rim. The ideal trajectory of the shot is somewhat controversial, but generally a proper arc is recommended. Players may shoot directly into the basket or may use the backboard to redirect the ball into the basket.

wilson evolution indoor basketball

The two most common shots that use the above described setup are the set-shot and the jump-shot. The set-shot is taken from a standing position, with neither foot leaving the floor, typically used for free throws, and in other circumstances whilst the jump-shot is taken in mid-air, the ball released near the top of the jump. This provides much greater power and range, and it also allows the player to elevate over the defender. Failure to release the ball before the feet return to the floor is considered a traveling violation.

Another common shot is called the lay-up. This shot requires the player to be in motion toward the basket, and to “lay” the ball “up” and into the basket, typically off the backboard (the backboard-free, underhand version is called a finger roll). The most crowd-pleasing and typically highest-percentage accuracy shot is the slam dunk, in which the player jumps very high and throws the ball downward, through the basket whilst touching it.

Another shot that is becoming common is the “circus shot”. The circus shot is a low-percentage shot that is flipped, heaved, scooped, or flung toward the hoop while the shooter is off-balance, airborne, falling down, and/or facing away from the basket. A back-shot is a shot taken when the player is facing away from the basket, and may be shot with the dominant hand, or both; but there is a very low chance that the shot will be successful.

A shot that misses both the rim and the backboard completely is referred to as an air-ball. A particularly bad shot, or one that only hits the backboard, is jocularly called a brick.

Rebounding

The objective of rebounding is to successfully gain possession of the basketball after a missed field goal or free throw, as it rebounds from the hoop or backboard. This plays a major role in the game, as most possessions end when a team misses a shot. There are two categories of rebounds: offensive rebounds, in which the ball is recovered by the offensive side and does not change possession, and defensive rebounds, in which the defending team gains possession of the loose ball. The majority of rebounds are defensive, as the team on defense tends to be in better position to recover missed shots.

Passing

A pass is a method of moving the ball between players. Most passes are accompanied by a step forward to increase power and are followed through with the hands to ensure accuracy.

A staple pass is the chest pass. The ball is passed directly from the passer’s chest to the receiver’s chest. A proper chest pass involves an outward snap of the thumbs to add velocity and leaves the defence little time to react.

Another type of pass is the bounce pass. Here, the passer bounces the ball crisply about two-thirds of the way from his own chest to the receiver. The ball strikes the court and bounces up toward the receiver. The bounce pass takes longer to complete than the chest pass, but it is also harder for the opposing team to intercept (kicking the ball deliberately is a violation). Thus, players often use the bounce pass in crowded moments, or to pass around a defender.

The overhead pass is used to pass the ball over a defender. The ball is released while over the passer’s head.

The outlet pass occurs after a team gets a defensive rebound. The next pass after the rebound is the outlet pass.

The crucial aspect of any good pass is it being difficult to intercept. Good passers can pass the ball with great accuracy and they know exactly where each of their other teammates prefers to receive the ball. A special way of doing this is passing the ball without looking at the receiving teammate. This is called a no-look pass.

Another advanced style of passing is the behind-the-back pass which, as the description implies, involves throwing the ball behind the passer’s back to a teammate. Although some players can perform such a pass effectively, many coaches discourage no-look or behind-the-back passes, believing them to be difficult to control and more likely to result in turnovers or violations.

[Related: Wikipedia.org basketballs]

Dribbling and Ball Handling

Dribbling is the act of bouncing the ball continuously with one hand, and is a requirement for a player to take steps with the ball. To dribble, a player pushes the ball down towards the ground with the fingertips rather than patting it; this ensures greater control.

When dribbling past an opponent, the dribbler should dribble with the hand farthest from the opponent, making it more difficult for the defensive player to get to the ball. It is therefore important for a player to be able to dribble competently with both hands.

Good dribblers (or “ball handlers”) tend to bounce the ball low to the ground, reducing the distance of travel of the ball from the floor to the hand, making it more difficult for the defender to “steal” the ball. Good ball handlers frequently dribble behind their backs, between their legs, and switch directions suddenly, making a less predictable dribbling pattern that is more difficult to defend against. This is called a crossover, which is the most effective way to move past defenders while dribbling.

A skilled player can dribble without watching the ball, using the dribbling motion or peripheral vision to keep track of the ball’s location. By not having to focus on the ball, a player can look for teammates or scoring opportunities, as well as avoid the danger of having someone steal the ball away from him/her.

Wilson18.org was once a campaign site for Tom Wilson, but now is operated fully for the promotion of basketballjumptraining.com, home for basketball training, tips and advice. Ryan Rainman writes for the blog and loves the Wilson Evolution basketball ball. He has written extensive reviews on Wilson Evolution Indoor Game Basketballs.

Be sure to also check out Checkball.org.